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Vapouriser (Comes with 50gms of Oxalic Acid & Instructions)

Vapouriser (Comes with 50gms of Oxalic Acid & Instructions)

$145.00

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  • Please remember the following use at timer and only vaporise for 2 mins.
  • Use 1/2 a level teaspoon
  • Only connect to a 12 volt battery
  • Place oxalic acid in the pan next to the element
  • Put the pan into the hive entrance under the brood frames
  • Cover the entrance with a damp cloth
  • Connect the 12 volt battery
  • Start the timer set for 2 min
  • After the 2 min disconnected the battery
  • Leave the hive closed for 2 min
  • Remove damp cloth
  • Remove your vapouriser.
  • Wait for the pan to cool down before you do the next hive.
  • Safety 
  • When using oxalic acid use safety gear ie: Gloves,goggles and a face mask.
  • Try and stand up wind during use
  • Treatment
  • You will need to treat every 10 days for 3 to 4 treatments to get the mites as they emerge with the brood.

 

The use of Oxalic Acid in the control of Varrroa Mites in Honey Bee Colonies.

From “Control of Varroa” by Mark Goodwin and Michelle Taylor.

 

Guidelines on use             Directions for use            

Oxalic acid is a more recent addition to the arsenal of organic acids used for varroa control.  Oxalic acid is a corrosive and poisonous acid like formic acid and is used in textile finishing and as a cleanser.

An application method for oxalic acid was developed in Europe.  The method involves mixing oxalic acid crystals into 1:1 sugar syrup, and then using a graduated syringe applying five millilitres of the syrup per frame covered in bees, directly on the bees, in early winter.  The colony should be broodless, and the syrup should be lukewarm to avoid chilling bees.  Outside temperature should be above 0°C.  The oxalic acid does not work through evaporation, so temperature is not as important as it is with essential oils or formic acid.  The action of oxalic acid is systemic where the bees consume the oxalic acid-sugar syrup and the varroa that feed on these bees then die.

A mixture of oxalic acid and sugar syrup trickled between combs in winter is a low-cost form of organic acid varroa control.

Research suggests that while there is little difference in effectiveness between 3.2% oxalic acid in the syrup and 4.2%, the lower concentration does not appear to effect colony build-up as much the next spring.  Higher concentrations can affect over-wintering and spring development in cold climates.  Repeated applications of lower concentrations can also affect colony build up the following spring.

Oxalic acid can be used to treat newly made-up nucleus colonies or splits during the broodless period that occurs prior to a new queen beginning to lay eggs.

A system is also used where oxalic acid crystals are placed on a heated metal plate which is slid into the entrance of a hive.  The heat causes the crystals to volatilise and the vapours kill the varroa.

Oxalic acid does not kill enough varroa by itself and must be used with other treatments.

As with formic acid care must be taken when handling oxalic acid because it is corrosive.  A dust mask, goggles, and chemical resistant gloves must be worn when handling the pure chemical and the syrup should be mixed only in a well ventilated room or outside.

Oxalic acid can also produce noticeable tastes in honey, and the Swiss maximum residue limit for taste is 400-900 ppm (depending on the honey aroma and taste).  However when applied in autumn no noticeable increase in oxalic acid residue was found in honey produced the following season.

Oxalic acid is approved for use in New Zealand.                                                                                                                

t GUIDELINE ON USE OF OXALIC ACID FOR VARROA CONTROL

This guideline has been produced by the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry Biosecurity Authority, and distributed to all registered beekeepers in New Zealand.

Enquiries should be directed to:     Programme Adviser     Surveillance and Response Team     MAF Biosecurity Authority     P O Box 2526     Wellington

This guideline outlines a method for the application of oxalic acid to beehives for varroa control.  It has been prepared from international literature on varroa control.  The method of oxalic acid application described has not been extensively trialled in New Zealand.  Effectiveness may be influenced by environmental factors at the time of application.

DisclaimerThe Crown, its employees and consultants do not accept any responsibility or liability whatsoever for any error of fact, omission, interpretation or opinion which may be present, however it may have occurred, nor for the consequences of any decision based on information in the publication.

Without in any way limiting the above statement, the Crown, its employees and consultants expressly disclaim all and any liability to any person in respect of anything, and the consequences of anything, done or omitted to be done in reliance, whether wholly or partly, upon the whole or any part of the contents of this publication.

Products used to control pests and diseases of bees must be approved by the Minister of Agriculture.  Oxalic acid has been approved by the Minister of Agriculture for varroa control in beehives, under section 62(2) of the Animal Products (Ancillary and Transitional Provisions) Act 1999.  This approval is subject to two conditions:

They are not applied to hives while honey supers are in place.They are used in compliance with the Code of Practice for “Own use of compounds” issued under section 28 of the Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997.

Under the Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines (ACVM) Regulations 2001, certain compounds which are not registered trade name products can be prepared and applied by a person to bees they own, on land they own or lawfully occupy, on conditions that the person complies with the Code of Practice for “Own use of compounds”.  While these compounds are not subject to registration, they must be used in a responsible manner.

People who use these compounds are subject to statutory obligations under the ACVM Act 1997, and are likely to be subject to statutory obligations under other legislation (i.e. Resource Management Act 1991, Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992, Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996, Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981.

Exempting compounds from registration under the ACVM Act does not exempt anyone from obligations imposed under any other legislation.

Sources of product: oxalic acid dihydrate can be purchased in powder form from a range of industrial chemical suppliers in New Zealand, and in small quantities form some pharmacies.

Minimum grade/standard of product: Minimum 97% oxalic acid dihydrate.  Maximum heavy metals {as PB l(lead)} 0.0005%.

Operator SafetyWarning:  Irritating to eyes.  Harmful in contact with skin and harmful or fatal if swallowed.  May produce skin discomfort.  Read label before using.

Precautions:Keep out of reach of children.Corrosive to eyes and skin by direct contact.Harmful or fatal if swallowed.Do not get in eyes, on skin or on clothing.Do not breathe in dust.Wear goggles or face shield and chemical-resistant gloves when handling oxalic acid.  A dust mask is recommended.Keep away from food, drink and animal feeding stuffs.Wash skin thoroughly with soap and water after handling.Remove clothing immediately if contaminated by splash or spill.Store and wash contaminated clothing separately from household laundry.

Spills:  Avoid dust.  Sweep/shovel to safe place.  Take off immediately all contaminated clothing and store in a plastic bag or wash separately as soon as possible.  Use water to clean floor and all objects contaminated by this material.

FIRST AID:Skin: Remove contaminated clothing immediately.  Wash affected area with soap or mild detergent and large amounts of water.  If chemical burn develops, cover area with a sterile, dry dressing and bandage securely.  Contact a physician immediately.

Eyes:  Wash eyes immediately with large amounts of water.  Cover with sterile bandages.  Contact a physician immediately.

Ingested:  Do not induce vomiting.  Drink large quantities of water or milk.  If vomiting occurs, administer fluids repeatedly.  Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person.  Contact a physician or Poison Control Centre immediately.

Inhaled:  Remove victim to a safe, uncontaminated area.  Rest, keep warm.  If breathing is shallow, give oxygen.  Get immediate medical attention.                                                                                                                    Back to top

 DIRECTIONS FOR USE:

Definition of product as used to treat bees:  3.2% oxalic acid (weight by volume or w/v) in sugar syrup.

Preparation:  Mix 1 litre (L) of water with 1 kg sucrose (table sugar) using a clean container in a secure area.  Add oxalic acid dihydrate to make a solution which is 3.2% oxalic acid (w/v).  Mix thoroughly.  (The purity of the oxalic acid should be provided by supplier along with mixing instructions to achieve 3.2% w/v)

This should be enough to treat about 25 hives that have an average of 10 frames of bees.  The concentration used is very important, so it is essential that accurate scales are used.  Your local pharmacy may be able to help.

Use oxalic acid once in late autumn/early winter when little or no brood is present.  Use a large volume syringe (e.g. 150 millilitres or ml).  Use 5 ml of the sugar syrup/oxalic acid mixture per frame of bees (bees filling the inter space between two frames end to end).  Take up the proper dose for the population of bees in the hive and trickle the syrup over the bees between the top bars in each box (Figure 2).  Using larger volumes or higher concentrations of oxalic acid may kill bees and or brood.  Do not use when honey supers are on the hive.

The effect of feeding oxalic acid at the same time as colonies are being fed sugar syrup to maintain colony food stores is unknown, and should be avoided until it has been tested.

Frequency of use:  Only use once in the autumn or winter.  Using it more than once may cause bee mortality or reduce the ability of the colonies to build up the following spring.

Record Keeping:  A record should be kept of all oxalic acid applications, including site name, number of hives, date of application, and amount of product used.  This will provide valuable information when assessing the effectiveness of different control strategies.

Effectiveness:  Oxalic acid will only kill varroa on adult bees.  Therefore it may only kill 30-40% of mites if there is brood in a hive.  It has been reported to kill up to 95% of mites in a broodless colony.

Withholding period:  Do not use when honey supers are in place to prevent contamination of marketable honey by unwanted residues.

Residues:  Oxalic acid is naturally present in honey at low levels.  At higher levels (400-900 ppm), it can produce noticeable tastes in honey.  When applied in autumn no noticeable increase in oxalic acid residue was found in honey produced the following season.

Monitoring efficacy:  The effectiveness of oxalic acid at killing varroa can be variable.  It is therefore important to measure varroa levels after treatment to ensure that varroa has been reduced to the required level.

Storage:  Store solution in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area.  Avoid storage with oxidising agents, strong alkalis and silver compounds.  Do not use solutions that have been made up for more than 6 months.

Disposal of waste material:  Dispose of used containers in a suitable landfill.  For information on the disposal of unused, unwanted or damaged product contact local Regional Council.

 

 

 
Safety Data Sheet

 

1. IDENTIFICATION OF THE MATERIAL AND SUPPLIER

Product Name:

Recommended use of the chemical and restrictions on use:

Supplier:
Street Address:

Telephone Number: Facsimile:
Emergency Telephone:

OXALIC ACID (NZ)

Laboratory reagent, in metal and equipment cleaning, fabric dyeing, leather tanning, and the ceramics, photography and rubber industries. Wood pulp bleaching, waste water treatment, removing calcium from water.

Orica New Zealand Lim ited
Orica Chemnet House
Level four, 123 Carlton Gore Road Newmarket, Auckland
New Zealand

+64 9 368 2700
+64 9 368 2710
0 800 734 607 (ALL HOURS)

2. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION

Classified as a Dangerous Good according to NZS 5433:2012 Transport of Dangerous Goods on Land. Classified as hazardous according to criteria in the HS (Minimum Degrees of Hazard) Regulations 2001. SIGNALWORD:DANGER

Subclasses:

Subclass 6.1 Subclass 6.8 Subclass 6.9 Subclass 8.1 Subclass 8.2 Subclass 8.3 Subclass 9.3

COR ROSIVE

8

Category D - Substances which are acutely toxic.
Category C - Substances that produce toxic human reproductive or developmental effects on or via lactation. Category B - Substances that are harmful to human target organs or systems.
Category A - Substances that are corrosive to metals.
Category C - Substances that are corrosive to dermal tissue.
Category A - Substances that are corrosive to ocular tissue.
Category B - Substances that are ecotoxic to terrestrial vertebrates.

3. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS

Components

CAS Number

Proportion

Hazard Codes

Oxalic acid

144-62-7

99-100%

H312 H302

4. FIRST AID MEASURES

For advice, contact a Poisons Information Centre (e.g. phone Australia 131 126; New Zealand 0800 764 766) or a doctor.

Product Name: OXALIC ACID (NZ) Substance No: 000000018803

Issued: 25/09/2012 Version: 2

Page 1 of 6

Safety Data Sheet

Inhalation:

Remove victim from area of exposure - avoid becoming a casualty. Remove contaminated clothing and loosen remaining clothing. Allow patient to assume most comfortable position and keep warm. Keep at rest until fully recovered. If patient finds breathing difficult and develops a bluish discolouration of the skin (which suggests a lack of oxygen in the blood - cyanosis), ensure airways are clear of any obstruction and have a qualified person give oxygen through a face mask. Apply artificial respiration if patient is not breathing. Seek immediate medical advice.

Skin Contact:

If spilt on large areas of skin or hair, immediately drench with running water and remove clothing. Continue to wash skin and hair with plenty of water (and soap if material is insoluble) until advised to stop by the Poisons Information Centre or a doctor. For skin burns, cover with a clean, dry dressing until medical help is available.

Eye Contact:

Immediately wash in and around the eye area with large amounts of water for at least 15 minutes. Eyelids to be held apart. Remove clothing if contaminated and wash skin. Urgently seek medical assistance. Transport to hospital or medical centre.

Ingestion:

Immediately rinse mouth with water. If swallowed, do NOT induce vomiting. Give a glass of water. Seek immediate medical assistance.

Indication of immediate medical attention and special treatment needed:

Treat symptomatically. Can cause corneal burns.

Suitable Extinguishing Media:

Fine water spray, normal foam, dry agent (carbon dioxide, dry chemical powder). Hazchem or Emergency Action Code: 2X

Specific hazards arising from the substance or mixture:

Combustible solid.

Special protective equipment and precautions for fire-fighters:

On burning will emit toxic fumes. Fire fighters to wear self-contained breathing apparatus and suitable protective clothing if risk of exposure to vapour or products of combustion. Keep containers cool with water spray.

Emergency procedures/Environmental precautions:

Shut off all possible sources of ignition. Clear area of all unprotected personnel. If contamination of sewers or waterways has occurred advise local emergency services.

Personal precautions/Protective equipment/Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up:

Wear protective equipment to prevent skin and eye contact and breathing in dust. Work up wind or increase ventilation. Cover with damp absorbent (inert material, sand or soil). Sweep or vacuum up, but avoid generating dust. Collect and seal in properly labelled containers or drums for disposal.

Precautions for safe handling: Avoid skin and eye contact and breathing in dust. Keep out of reach of children.

Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities: Store away from incompatible materials described in Section 10. Keep containers closed when not in use - check regularly for spills. Protect from moisture. Store in a cool, dry, well ventilated place and out of direct sunlight.

5. FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES

6. ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

7. HANDLING AND STORAGE

Product Name: OXALIC ACID (NZ) Substance No: 000000018803

Issued: 25/09/2012 Version: 2

Page 2 of 6

Safety Data Sheet

8. EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION

Oxalic acid: WES-TWA 1 mg/m3; WES-STEL 2 mg/m3

As published by the New Zealand Department of Labour (Health & Safety).

WES - TWA (Workplace Exposure Standard - Time Weighted Average) - The eight-hour, time-weighted average exposure standard is designed to protect the worker from the effects of long-term exposure.

WES - STEL (Workplace Exposure Standard - Short Term Exposure Limits) - The 15 minute average exposure standard. Applies to any 15 minute period in the working day and is designed to protect the worker against adverse effects of irritation, chronic or irreversible tissue change, or narcosis that may increase the likelihood of accidents. The WES-STEL is not an alternative to the WES-TWA; both short-term and eight-hour, time-weighted average exposures should be determined.

These Workplace Exposure Standards are guides to be used in the control of occupational health hazards. All atmospheric contamination should be kept to as low a level as is workable. These workplace exposure standards should not be used as fine dividing lines between safe and dangerous concentrations of chemicals. They are not a measure of relative toxicity.

Appropriate engineering controls:

Ensure ventilation is adequate to maintain air concentrations below Workplace Exposure Standards. Avoid generating and breathing in dusts. Use with local exhaust ventilation or while wearing dust mask. Keep containers closed when not in use.

Individual protection measures, such as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):

The selection of PPE is dependant on a detailed risk assessment. The risk assessment should consider the work situation, the physical form of the chemical, the handling methods, and environmental factors.

Orica Personal Protection Guide No. 1, 1998: F - OVERALLS, SAFETY SHOES, CHEMICAL GOGGLES, GLOVES, DUST MASK.

Wear overalls, chemical goggles and impervious gloves. Avoid generating and inhaling dusts. If dust exists, wear dust mask/respirator meeting the requirements of AS/NZS 1715 and AS/NZS 1716. If dust exists, wear dust mask/particulate respirator meeting the requirements of AS/NZS 1715 and AS/NZS 1716. Always wash hands before smoking, eating, drinking or using the toilet. Wash contaminated clothing and other protective equipment before storage or re-use.

9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

Physical state:
Colour:
Odour:
Solubility:
Specific Gravity:
Relative Vapour Density (air=1): Vapour Pressure (20 °C):

Flash Point (°C):
Flammability Limits (%): Autoignition Temperature (°C): Product Name: OXALIC ACID (NZ) Substance No: 000000018803

Solid
White Odourless Soluble in water. 1.65

4.4

Page 3 of 6

Issued: 25/09/2012 Version: 2

Safety Data Sheet

9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

Melting Point/Range (°C): pH:

165
0.7 (at 50g/L water, 20°C)

10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

12. ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION

13. DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS

Product Name: OXALIC ACID (NZ) Substance No: 000000018803

Issued: 25/09/2012 Version: 2

Stable under normal ambient and anticipated storage and handling conditions of temperature and pressure.

Chemical stability:
Possibility of hazardous reactions:Reacts explosively with strong oxidising agents , and some silver compounds .

Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.

Conditions to avoid: Avoid exposure to heat, sources of ignition, and open flame. Avoid exposure to moisture.

Incompatible materials: Incompatible with alkalis , alkali metals , oxidising agents , silver compounds , iron , iron compounds , acid chlorides , chlorites , hypochlorites , furfuryl alcohol , ammonia .

Hazardous decomposition Oxides of carbon. products:

No adverse health effects expected if the product is handled in accordance with this Safety Data Sheet and the product label. Symptoms or effects that may arise if the product is mishandled and overexposure occurs are:

Ingestion:

Eye contact:

Skin contact:

Inhalation: Acute toxicity:

Oral LD50 (rat): 375 mg/kg (female)

Swallowing can result in nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain and chemical burns to the gastrointestinal tract.

A severe eye irritant. Corrosive to eyes; contact can cause corneal burns. Contamination of eyes can result in permanent injury.

Contact with skin will result in severe irritation. Corrosive to skin - may cause skin burns.

Material may be irritant to the mucous membranes of the respiratory tract (airways).

Chronic effects: May produce toxic human reproductive or developmental effects on or via lactation. May be harmful to human target organs or systems.

Ecotoxicity Avoid contaminating waterways. Terrestrial toxicity: Toxic to terrestrial vertebrates.

Disposal Methods:

Refer to local government authority for disposal recommendations. Dispose of contents/container in accordance with local/regional/national/international regulations.

Page 4 of 6

Safety Data Sheet Road and Rail Transport

Classified as a Dangerous Good according to NZS 5433:2012 Transport of Dangerous Goods on Land.

14. TRANSPORT INFORMATION

COR ROSIVE

8

UN No:
Transport Hazard Class: Packing Group:
Proper Shipping Name or Technical Name:
Hazchem or Emergency Action Code:

Marine Transport

3261
8 Corrosive
III
CORROSIVE SOLID, ACIDIC, ORGANIC, N.O.S. (OXALIC ACID)

2X

Classified as Dangerous Goods by the criteria of the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code) for transport by sea; DANGEROUS GOODS.

UN No:
Transport Hazard Class: Packing Group:
Proper Shipping Name or Technical Name:

IMDG EMS Fire: IMDG EMS Spill:

Air Transport

3261
8 Corrosive
III
CORROSIVE SOLID, ACIDIC, ORGANIC, N.O.S. (OXALIC ACID)

F-A S-B

Classified as Dangerous Goods by the criteria of the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations for transport by air; DANGEROUS GOODS.

UN No:
Transport Hazard Class: Packing Group:
Proper Shipping Name or Technical Name:

C l a ssi f i c a t i o n :

3261
8 Corrosive
III
CORROSIVE SOLID, ACIDIC, ORGANIC, N.O.S. (OXALIC ACID)

15. REGULATORY INFORMATION

Classified as hazardous according to criteria in the HS (Minimum Degrees of Hazard) Regulations 2001.

S u b c l a sse s:

Subclass 6.1 Category D - Substances which are acutely toxic.
Subclass 6.8 Category C - Substances that produce toxic human reproductive or developmental effects on or via lactation. Subclass 6.9 Category B - Substances that are harmful to human target organs or systems.
Subclass 8.1 Category A - Substances that are corrosive to metals.
Subclass 8.2 Category C - Substances that are corrosive to dermal tissue.
Subclass 8.3 Category A - Substances that are corrosive to ocular tissue.
Subclass 9.3 Category B - Substances that are ecotoxic to terrestrial vertebrates.

Product Name: OXALIC ACID (NZ) Substance No: 000000018803

Issued: 25/09/2012 Version: 2

Page 5 of 6

Safety Data Sheet

16. OTHER INFORMATION

This safety data sheet has been prepared by Orica Toxicology & SDS Services.

Reason(s) for Issue:

5 Yearly Revised Primary SDS

This SDS summarises to our best knowledge at the date of issue, the chemical health and safety hazards of the material and general guidance on how to safely handle the material in the workplace. Since Orica Limited cannot anticipate or control the conditions under which the product may be used, each user must, prior to usage, assess and control the risks arising from its use of the material.

If clarification or further information is needed, the user should contact their Orica representative or Orica Limited at the contact details on page 1.

Orica Limited's responsibility for the material as sold is subject to the terms and conditions of sale, a copy of which is available upon request.

Product Name: OXALIC ACID (NZ) Substance No: 000000018803

Issued: 25/09/2012 Version: 2

Page 6 of 6 

 
 

 


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